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Reshaping the International Order

Friday, June 6, 2008

What Does a World Governed by Humanistic Socialism Look Like?
Reshaping the International Order Part 1

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
April 7, 2008

“The establishment of a New International Economic Order entails fundamental changes in political, social, cultural and other aspects of society, changes which would bring about a New International Order.” – RIO: Reshaping the International Order, 1976 (p5)

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome [1] coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“Many in the RIO group believe that this equitable social order could best be described as humanistic socialism…” – 63

So what exactly does a new social order based on “humanistic socialism” look like? Below is the RIO group’s own description of what the future should look like.

Collective Workers and Full Employment

“Society must also deliberately aim at creating employment for all those seeking it and at ensuring that the distribution over different types of jobs achieves a balance between the satisfaction derived from the job and the satisfaction of the needs of society. The latter necessitates that certain unpleasant (heavy, dirty, dangerous) activities be performed. If these activities can be learnt relatively easily, they could be performed by all citizens. Their efforts could be organized in the form of ‘land’ or ‘neighbourhood armies’ for work in rural areas, in the field of environmental care…” – 69

“A full employment policy should be adopted by all governments as part of their development plan.” – 145

“As a counterpart to these rights, a number of duties must be accepted, especially the duty to use one’s capacities in the interest of an adequate level of production…” – 63

“Public power should be used to ensure that education is geared to meet the needs of individuals and the needs of society, that is, all individuals. The supply of qualified types of labour should be so planned as to equal, to the greatest extent possible, the demand for them by society (i.e. by the ‘organizers of production’).” – 69

A Planned World Economy

“Effective application of public power implies the need for middle and long-range planning at different levels… The UN Economic and Social Council might be best suited for undertaking such a task, perhaps assisted by the UN Development Planning Committee.” – 70

“At the highest level, the level of world affairs, international institutions must form the prime movers of planned change.” – 100

“… the optimum utilization of human and physical resources in the world as a whole.” – 140

“One of the basic questions which today faces the international community is whether it should accelerate the process of this evolution and consciously put in place the various elements of a system for global planning and the management of resources

The achievement of this global planning and management system calls for the conscious transfer of power – a gradual transfer to be sure – from the nation State to the world organization. Only when this transfer takes place can the organization become effective and purposeful.” – 184

Private Sector and Global Free Trade

“New forms of cooperation between private initiative and public authorities will have to be characterized by a certain balance of power…” – 280

“In the trade field, an International Trade and Development Organization, formed by expanding the responsibilities of UNCTAD [United Nations Conference on Trade and Development], should be set up with a very broad mandate for overall coordination of policy issues relating to international trade in primary commodities and manufactured goods. Likewise, UNIDO’s [United Nations Industrial Development Organization] responsibilities should be increased to enable it to participate in the planning of a more equitable world industrial order;…” – 184

“This [Third World development] implies that, if a new international order is to be created, the rich nations must be prepared to give up part of their future productive capacity. To be able to do this smoothly they will need to resort to adjustment policies and such policies must form part of their development strategies… The creation of an optimal international division of labour, and as such the selective development of economic activities in Third World countries, calls for the substantial extension of such adjustment policies…

It is no longer desirable that the industrialized countries adopt policies of protecting their labour-intensive industries in the manufacturing sector. Rather, they should seek, as must the Third World, to develop those industries in which they have a comparative advantage…

The process described, albeit with distortions, is already taking place: some sectors of Western manufacturing industry are moving to Third World countries. The movement of Western European garment industries to North Africa is a case in point. As such, private initiative will no doubt prove responsible for a large part of the adjustment required. That adjustments are at present insufficient is witnessed by the millions of workers who migrate from the Third World to seek employment in the Western industrialized nations. To the extent that the adjustments brought about by private initiative on the strength of international market forces will be inadequate, and in view of the fact that private enterprises may not be sufficiently creative nor responsive to the needs of countries, adjustment must be stimulated and guided by selective taxes and subsidies. Subsidies should be offered to those industries with a clear potential for contributing to a country’s or a regions’ development efforts. Such subsidies could aim at supporting changes, where necessary, in the production mix of enterprises…

To ensure the effectiveness of adjustment policies, there is a clear need for coordination of policies both between the industrialized countries and between public authorities and the private sector…” – 112

“The industrialized countries, on their part, will have to introduce policies of adjustment, develop specialization in knowledge-intensive products and gradually introduce and enforce environmental protection standards.” – 143

“In the long term, transnational enterprises will still form part of the world structure, in either their present form of private enterprises or in a renovated form comprising genuine international ventures.” – 160

Public International Enterprises

“The possibility of genuine internationalization of some transnational enterprises or transnational operations should be further investigated. They could be owned, controlled and managed by an international development authority. The pharmaceutical industry could be used as an initial test case for analysis because of its international social implications.” – 281

“Active sharing of benefits [of the ocean], with particular regard to the needs of the less developed countries, through a variety of devices including international public enterprises, especially for fishing and offshore oil production; international tax on ocean uses, etc.” – 175

Consumption Patterns

“The rich nations… must develop new consumption styles which are less wasteful, less resource – intensive and geared to the consumption of social services rather than of superfluous consumer durables.” – 183

“Growth in equality would make it less difficult for people to accept the principle of self-restraint in the satisfaction of material needs, the ideological cornerstone of the future ‘steady state’. It would equally create the necessary social conditions for self-control of family size and the consequent reduction in population pressure; birth-control campaigns are likely to remain largely ineffective (unless enforced by coercion, which is clearly unacceptable) up to the time that peasants are freed from material insecurity, that infant mortality rates go down, and that the use of unpaid child labour is no longer necessary to make ends meet.” – 162

“Ultimately, they must aim to construct their policies on a series of ‘maxima’ which define an appropriate style of civilized living in a world of deprivation and declare that all consumption beyond that fixed maxima is not only waste but a conscious action against the welfare of large numbers of poor and disprivileged, their own children, and the prospects for a peaceful world.” – 76

Financial and Monetary Change

“(a) The gradual introduction of a system of international taxation which should be handled by a World Treasury, both to meet the current as well as the development needs of the poorer nations;

(b) The creation of an international reserve currency by an international authority, such as an International Central Bank, which should be under international management without being dominated by the interests of one particular group of nations;” -184

“The statutes of transnational enterprises should be under the supervision of, and their profits taxed by, an inter- or supranational authority.” – 160

More on the proposed changes to the financial system in part 2 of this series entitled: Reshaping the International Financial Order.

International Control of All Mineral Resources – The Common Heritage of Mankind Concept

“In the long term, and assuming progress towards the creation of an equitable international economic and social order leading to a pooling of material and non-material resources, mineral resources will need to be viewed as a common heritage of mankind. This concept implies both a real world market for all mineral resources and a system of world taxation to replace national mining taxation. The revenues collected should be redistributed among Third World countries – possibly through such an agency as IDA [International Development Association – World Bank group]…

This tax could, for instance, be introduced as one of a moderate rate and gradually be raised to something in the order of 70 per cent of profits on fossil fuels and 50 per cent of the value of production of ores (including uranium).

Such a tax would, like the present taxes on oil products, in fact be paid by the consumers…

Such a tax, at the rates proposed, would probably induce consumers to restrict their consumption of mineral raw materials…” – 148

“It is now recognized that a more elaborate system of careful husbandry and management of raw materials and scarce resources is inevitable.” – 244

The redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” as well as the establishment and expansion of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” is discussed in more detail in part 3 of this series entitled: “Functional” Sovereignty and the Common Heritage of Mankind.

Reshaping Public Opinion

“Public opinion is no phenomenon sui generic. It is in part the result of government policies and by definition politicians cannot hide behind their own creation. If some sectors of public opinion in the industrialized countries are immersed in the rhetoric and slogans associated with misunderstanding, then much of this may be inherited from their political leaders. And if these leaders are in part responsible for a situation which impedes acceptance of the need for change, then they themselves must be held responsible for changing this situation.” – 110

The reshaping of public opinion and the importance of the scientist and experts is further described in part 4 of this series entitled: Reshaping Public Opinion and the White Coated Propagandists.

World Food Authority

“A number of measures have been proposed which should bring greater planning and coordination in the field of domestic food production and international supplies of food, including the establishment of world grain reserves… In the last analysis, it may require the setting up of a World Food Authority to supervise this vital area of human activity and survival” – 184

More on the establishment and functioning of the World Food Authority in part 5 of this series entitled: Population Control and the World Food Authority.

A Glimpse into the New Order

The final article in this series will examine a wide range of topics including: regional unions, world solidarity, foundations of the international legal system, freedom and the establishment of an standing United Nations military.

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3


 

Reshaping the International Financial Order
Reshaping the International Order Part 2

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
April 14, 2008

“Among the instruments of implementation at the international level, I attach the highest priority to the introduction of international taxation and the establishment of an international central bank.” – Mahbub ul Haq, Director of Policy Planning World Bank (1970-1982) and RIO Member (p321)

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome [1] coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

Part 1 of this series gives an overview of the proposed new international order described by the RIO report as “humanistic socialism”. This includes: collective neighbourhood armies, a fully planned world economy, global free trade, public international enterprises, proposed changes in consumption patterns among other topics.

Below is a summary of some of the changes to the financial system proposed by The Club of Rome.

Creation of a World Reserve Currency

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“Phasing out of national reserve currencies as well as gold from reserve creation, confining increasingly the latter to SDR [Special Drawing Rights] type assets created by joint decisions…” – 128

“The residual use of gold as a reserve stock for central banks should and will be phased out gradually.” – 199

“The creation of an international reserve currency by an international authority, such as an International Central Bank, which should be under international management without being dominated by the interests of one particular group of nations;” – 184

“Fundamental reforms in the international monetary system so that international liquidity is not created in such an unplanned fashion that it generates alternate cycles of inflation, stagflation and depression. If national reserve currencies are replaced by an international reserve currency, to be created and managed by the international community in line with the genuine needs for the growth of the international economic system and with special regard to the pressing needs of the Third World, it can considerably help in avoiding some of the present unplanned fluctuations in economic activity.” – 183

Some tricks never seem to get old. Prevention of “alternate cycles of inflation, stagflation and depression” is exactly the same hogwash used to sell the Federal Reserve Act to the Americans in 1913. How well did that work?

Creation of a World Treasury and Global Taxation

“It also follows that some groups must today devote their efforts to the preparation of long range proposals in order to ensure that they will be operative on time. This applies especially to investigations into the feasibility of the more ambitious long range proposals, such as the creation of a World Treasury.” – 125

“The gradual introduction of a system of international taxation which should be handled by a World Treasury, both to meet the current as well as the development needs of the poorer nations;” – 184

“The statutes of transnational enterprises should be under the supervision of, and their profits taxed by, an inter- or supranational authority.” – 160

“international commons… ocean-tolls and air-tolls should be considered…” – 165

“these observations would suggest that, in the long run, a World Treasury could form an effective instrument for attaining some of the aims of an international community. In that it would operate from a current budget of expenditures, it would require a current budget of income. This would be derived from two obvious sources: revenue from international taxes and from the world community’s ownership of productive resources. Taxes and incomes, profits, the use of scarce resources and the royalties received from concessions could figure among the most important types of revenue.” – 131

“Ultimately, there is a need for the equivalent of a World Treasury, the resources of which are derived from international taxation and ownership of international productive resources (such as the resources of the oceans).” – 133

Some Techniques of Implementation

One implementation technique requires the use of “pioneering” countries to voluntarily submit to international taxation and their new monetary order.

“A desirable form of international decision-making, however, is one in which a genuinely supranational authority takes decisions on a qualified majority principle. A qualified majority may comprise a system of weighted votes, be based on a simple majority, or based on a system in which not only the total number of representatives but also the representatives of some well defined groups must together form a majority… (b) A decision-making body can be initiated by several pioneering countries on a voluntary basis and then be gradually extended. Some of the means used could first be applied at low levels, for example, a tax on consumer durables, and be gradually raised and extended to include more categories and eventually more countries. (c) Membership of an international decision-making body should be open to both public authorities and private organizations, whether non-profit or profit-making, or a combination of these categories.” – 104

Another technique of implementation requires the use of organizations like OPEC to collect international taxes on behalf of the world community.

“The Financing of Development: A new framework for international resource transfers form an essential part of the effort to establish a new international order. It will take time to negotiate such a framework and put its various elements in place, but at least some of the principles on which this framework should be based can be spelt out. (I) An element of automation must be built into the resource transfer system. To be realistic, the world community is still too early in its stage of evolution and recognition of its interdependence to accept the concept of international taxation of the rich nations for the benefit of the poor nations. But the concept need not be accepted in its entirety: it can be introduced gradually over time through a variety of devices:… (b) certain sources of international financing can be developed – such as tax on non-renewable resources, tax on international pollutants… (c) if the rich industrialized nations are unwilling to tax themselves, others can collect and distribute these tax proceeds on the basis of what the rich nations consume – e.g. even a one-dollar per barrel ‘development levy’ by OPEC…” – 216

One World Currency

“The Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States… already lays down the fundamental principles which should govern international economic relations. The transformation, over time, of the Charter into the proposed framework treaty would greatly facilitate the establishment of a new international order. If this is to be done, some more specific provisions, omitted from the Charter, should be considered for inclusion in the framework treaty. Such provisions could include:…

(g) All States shall accept an international currency to be created by an international authority;” – 117

The Club of Rome is currently working on a project entitled Monetary Simplification Euro/Dollar: Towards a Global Currency headed by Ramon Tamames.

Conclusion

The next part in this series addresses the redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” as well as the use of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” to gain international control of not just the oceans, atmosphere and outer space but also all material and non-material resources. Part 4 discusses the generation of public opinion and the use of white coated propagandists. The creation of a World Food Authority and its use for population control is examined in part 5. The final article in this series deals with a variety of issues including global solidarity, regional unions, legal changes and a standing United Nations Peace Force.

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3


 

“Functional” Sovereignty and the Common Heritage of Mankind
Reshaping the International Order Part 3

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
April 21, 2008

“The achievement of this global planning and management system calls for the conscious transfer of power – a gradual transfer to be sure – from the nation State to the world organization. Only when this transfer takes place can the organization become effective and purposeful.” – RIO: Reshaping the International Order, 1976 (p185)

This article addresses the redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” by The Club of Rome. Also discussed is the use of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” to gain international control of not just the oceans, atmosphere and outer space but also all material and non-material resources.

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome [1] coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

Part 1 of this series gives an overview of the proposed new international order described by the RIO report as “humanistic socialism”. This includes: collective neighbourhood armies, a fully planned world economy, global free trade, public international enterprises, proposed changes in consumption patterns among other topics. Changes to the financial system including international taxation and the creation of a World Treasury, World Central Bank and World Currency are examined in part 2.

Territorial Sovereignty versus Functional Sovereignty

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“Given the growing list of problems confronting mankind, every effort must be made to stimulate processes which point in directions which can be deemed desirable. This would certainly apply, for example, to the tendency towards the increasing centralization of decision-making involving issues beyond national frontiers should be viewed as a logical continuation of the process of change and a precondition for the effective assertion of national sovereignty.” – 103

The “increasing centralization of [international] decision-making” being a “precondition for the effective assertion of national sovereignty” may seem contradictory. The reason for this misunderstanding is your definition of sovereignty is based on an apparently outdated “territorial sovereignty” instead of the much more modern and politically correct “functional sovereignty”.

“In other words, the traditional concept of territorial sovereignty should be replaced by the concept of functional sovereignty, which distinguishes jurisdiction over specific uses from sovereignty over geographic space. This would permit the interweaving of national jurisdiction and international competences within the same territorial space and open the possibility of applying the concept of the common heritage of mankind both beyond and within the limits of national jurisdiction.”- 172

That is right, “sovereignty” no longer involves governmental control within a geographic space, rather it refers to governmental control of specific functions within a geographic space. Which functions would depend on the dictates of a world authority.

“Acceptance of these elements calls for a reinterpretation of the concept of national sovereignty. Participation and social control suggest a functional rather than a territorial interpretation of sovereignty, or jurisdiction over determined uses rather than geographical space. Conceptually, this interpretation will make possible the progressive internationalization and socialization of all world resources – material and non-material – based upon the ‘common heritage of mankind’ principle. It also permits the secure accommodation of inclusive and exclusive uses of these resources, or, in other words, the interweaving of national and international jurisdiction within the same territorial space… Ultimately, we must air for decentralized sovereignty with the network of strong international institutions which will make it possible.” – 82

Common Heritage of Mankind as “Functional Ownership”

“… the new concepts of functional sovereignty and functional ownership (common heritage of mankind).” – 314

“The [Communist Yugoslavian] concept of social ownership and its attributes are clearly applicable to the ‘common heritage’ concept.” – 81

“Effective planning and management calls for the fundamental restructuring of the United Nations so as to give it broad economic powers and a more decisive mandate for international economic decision-making… It is also hoped that major changes in the United Nations structure will be made over the next decade so that it is not only able to play a more forceful role in world political affairs but it is also able to become more of a World Development Authority in managing the socio-economic affairs of the international community. … The most effective way of articulating the planning and management functions of this organization would be through a functional confederation of international organizations, based upon existing, restructured and, in some instances, new United Nations agencies – to be linked through an integrative machinery. This system and its machinery, if it is really to reflect interdependencies between nations and solidarity between peoples, should ultimately aim at the pooling and sharing of all resources, material and non-material, including means of production, with a view to ensuring effective planning and management of the world economy and of global resource use in a way which would meet the essential objectives of equity and efficiency.” – 185

“In the long term, and assuming progress towards the creation of an equitable international economic and social order leading to a pooling of material and non-material resources, mineral resources will need to be viewed as a common heritage of mankind. This concept implies both a real world market for all mineral resources and a system of world taxation to replace national mining taxation. The revenues collected should be redistributed among Third World countries – possibly through such an agency as IDA [International Development Association – World Bank group]…

This tax could, for instance, be introduced as one of a moderate rate and gradually be raised to something in the order of 70 per cent of profits on fossil fuels and 50 per cent of the value of production of ores (including uranium).

Such a tax would, like the present taxes on oil products, in fact be paid by the consumers…

Such a tax, at the rates proposed, would probably induce consumers to restrict their consumption of mineral raw materials…” – 148

This concept includes the manipulation of the Third World “national liberation” movements in the post colonial era. These are only stepping stones toward “functional sovereignty”.

“[Third World territorial sovereignty] is a weapon which must be used in the struggle for a new international order.” – 247

“After the exercise of national sovereignty by Third World countries over their national resources has helped to establish more equality between mineral producing and consuming countries, a switch to the concept of the ‘common heritage of mankind’ is recommended and a gradual transformation of the principle of territorial sovereignty into functional sovereignty. This must be viewed as the most desirable approach to the world management of national and other resources, material and non-material.” – 150

“Sovereignty and the Common Heritage of Mankind… the first objective to be achieved is the attainment by Third World countries of full sovereignty over their resources in compliance with the UNCERDS [United Nations Charter of the Economic Rights and Duties of States]. Only after this objective has been achieved can the concept of the common heritage of mankind, traditionally limited to resources considered as res nullius such as the oceans and outer space, be expanded to new domains such as mineral resources, science and technology, means of production and other sources of wealth. After the exercise of national sovereignty has contributed toward the creation of a more equitable international order, the aim should be to pool all world resources – material and non-material – with a view to ensuring effective planning and management of the world economy and of global resource use in a way which would meet the dual objectives of equity and efficiency. In this perspective resources would need to be managed on the basis of decentralized planetary sovereignty. Proposals contained in the following chapters for the application of the common heritage concept to particular fields should thus be viewed in this broader context.” – 123

Remember when you hear the term “Common Heritage of Mankind” it does not just refer to the oceans, atmosphere and outer space, it refers to all material and non-material resources. Anything that might be considered a source of wealth would be brought under strict international authority. Keep in mind non-material resources includes, among other things, the education of “human resources”.

Conclusion

The next part in this series discusses the generation of public opinion and the use of white coated propagandists. The creation of a World Food Authority and its use for population control is examined in part 5. The final article in this series deals with a variety of issues including global solidarity, regional unions, legal changes and a standing United Nations Peace Force.

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3


 

Reshaping Public Opinion and the White Coated Propagandists
Reshaping the International Order Part 4

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
April 28, 2008

“Atomic and political scientists from Harvard University and MIT meeting in November 1975 concluded that an atomic war will certainly occur before the year 2000. This, they believed, could only be prevented by the decision of all nation-states to surrender their sovereignty to an authoritarian world government, a possibility they viewed as unlikely.” – RIO: Reshaping the International Order, 1976 (p46)

Public opinion is not generated by the public it is driven into them by marketing and propaganda. One of the main aspects of generating public opinion is the use of experts or specialists to tell the public what to think and give them a false sense of security derived from the belief that there are armies of experts making all of the difficult decisions for them. What if the legions of experts are just white coated propagandists?

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome [1] coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

Part 1 of this series gives an overview of the proposed new international order described by the RIO report as “humanistic socialism”. This includes: collective neighbourhood armies, a fully planned world economy, global free trade, public international enterprises, proposed changes in consumption patterns among other topics. Changes to the financial system including international taxation and the creation of a World Treasury, World Central Bank and World Currency are examined in part 2. Part 3 addresses the redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” as well as the use of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” to gain international control of not just the oceans, atmosphere and outer space but also all material and non-material resources.

Importance of Public Opinion

Any attempt at creating a new international order requires the reshaping of public opinion from their current modes of thought into newer more appropriate forms. This important detail was not overlooked by The Club of Rome.

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“The possibility of implementing ideas of a new power structure would, in democratic societies, necessitate the acceptance of such ideas by wide sections of public opinion. It is of paramount importance, therefore, that new ways and means be found to establish, within industrialized countries, contacts between formal and informal groups of concerned citizens, scientists and politicians…” – 109

Political feasibility. Crucially important especially during the early phases of the transformation of the existing order…” – 101

“Development implies a constant destruction of sociological and psychological structures. The real problem of development is cleverly to balance positive and real improvements with severe destructions… It is the responsibility of every nation to make its own choice between economic progress and socio-psych structure destructions, and to define its own fundamental objectives for real development, which is the development of man as a totality and of the totality of men.” – (Part of RIO member Maurice Guernier’s position statement) – 321

“The satisfaction of needs implies that each person available for and willing to work should have an adequately remunerated job… Education is the most important non-material component for fulfilling individual ambitions… At a higher level, education not only contributes directly to individual satisfaction by developing that individual’s spiritual endowment, but also indirectly by preparing the individual, mentally as well as morally, for a future role in a changing world…” – 64

Reshaping Public Opinion

Public opinion is not generated from the public, but rather given to them from politicians, experts, fiction, news media, etc.

“Public opinion is no phenomenon sui generic. It is in part the result of government policies and by definition politicians cannot hide behind their own creation. If some sectors of public opinion in the industrialized countries are immersed in the rhetoric and slogans associated with misunderstanding, then much of this may be inherited from their political leaders. And if these leaders are in part responsible for a situation which impedes acceptance of the need for change, then they themselves must be held responsible for changing this situation.” – 110

No Technocracy, Just White Coated Propagandists

“One of our main weapons in this search is the vast arsenal of scientists we are potentially able to deploy. To fully utilize this resource, we must deliberately choose to focus investigation in directions we believe to be really relevant.” – 107

“In political process too, the search for ‘new combinations’ can be expected to produce valuable results. Such a search is likely to demonstrate the responsibilities which scientists and other specialists have, not only to their nations, but also to the constituency of mankind. In the past, specialists have often been reluctant to engage in political debate or to share their knowledge and fears with the general public. Given social dilemmas, they have often preferred to adopt neutral rather than value positions, to tacitly advise rather than openly advocate. This generalization no longer holds true. In many branches of science there are radical movements. Increasingly, both in the rich and poor worlds, scientists are involved in active advocacy which they see as an intellectual and ethical duty.

These observations suggest that specialists be provided with greater opportunities to participate in the making of decisions in areas of vital importance to the future of mankind This is not to suggest the creation of a technocracy nor that political will can ever be substituted by scientific expertise… Specialists must serve as ‘advocates of the unborn’ and the expansion of their role can be viewed as an example of functional representation in international decision-making.

Not only must specialists advocate courses of action in international fora, they must also more fully commit themselves to development efforts at the local level. Their commitment must be total, their allegiance to a problem or community unstinting. Experts operating through bilateral and multilateral channels have not always meet these requirements. The ‘new expert’, in actively promoting local self-reliant development, may need to subordinate his own values even his knowledge, to those of the community he is attempting to serve. We have seen the rise of ‘barefoot doctors’; we must encourage the rise of ‘barefoot experts’.” – 108

The above quote clearly states that the “new experts” should form a league of white coated propagandists willing to subordinate their knowledge (the only thing they have to offer) to a desired political agenda. It should also be noted the use of the term “functional representation”. This is significant because the Club of Rome redefines sovereignty from what they call “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” completely changing the meaning of sovereignty. More on the redefinition of sovereignty here.

Using Other Groups

“The most important options for organizing institutions lie in three main areas. The first relates to the way in which the means of operating society are grouped into bunches which can appropriately be handled by one institution. From the viewpoint of efficiency, the most suitable approach would be to group together those means requiring similar techniques of control. The second option concerns the various levels of decision-making and the hierarchy corresponding to it. This important structural consideration applies to single institutions as well as to the relationship between persons and between institutions. … Third… Membership should not be limited to national governments; it should also embrace non-governmental organizations of many kinds operating at different levels.” – 101

“Whereas national public opinion may exist in the singular, internationally it exists in the plural… Groups of many different kinds, both in and outside the production process – students, trade unions, scientists – from both the Third World and the industrialized countries should join forces in their attempts to shape public and political opinion. The aim here must be the internationalization of attempts at ‘conscience-raising’. There would appear to be tremendous scope for a range of non-governmental organizations in this field and for cooperation among them.” – 111

“… a conscious attempt must be made to organize intellectual and political lobbies to re-educate international public and political opinion.” – 177

“Convincing Public and Political Opinion: Coordinated and intensified effort should be made, particularly in industrialized countries, to publicize the need to create an international social and economic order which is perceived as more equitable by all peoples. … The primary task of many non-governmental organizations must be to undertake the effort suggested.” – 122

The Ministry of Third World Truth

The Club of Rome proposes the creation of a Ministry of Third World Truth to help shape international public opinion.

“Such reform [of news media] should include the creation of a Third World information centre to specifically serve Third World needs and to facilitate the dissemination of information on the Third World, both in industrialized and Third World countries.” – 111

Conclusion

The creation of a World Food Authority and its use for population control is examined in part 5. The final article in this series deals with a variety of issues including global solidarity, regional unions, legal changes and a standing United Nations Peace Force.

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3


 

Population Control and a World Food Authority
Reshaping the International Order Part 5

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
May 5, 2008

“… it is of utmost importance that an equilibrium be established between the world’s total population and the capacity of ‘spaceship earth’…” – RIO: Reshaping the International Order, 1976 (p124)

The establishment of a World Food Authority to control the food supply of the world is a major goal of The Club of Rome’s RIO report. This issue is intertwined with exaggerated fears of environmental collapse and the elite’s obsession with population control.

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome [1] coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

Part 1 of this series gives an overview of the proposed new international order described by the RIO report as “humanistic socialism”. This includes: collective neighbourhood armies, a fully planned world economy, global free trade, public international enterprises, proposed changes in consumption patterns among other topics. Changes to the financial system including international taxation and the creation of a World Treasury, World Central Bank and World Currency are examined in part 2. Part 3 addresses the redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” as well as the use of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” to gain international control of not just the oceans, atmosphere and outer space but also all material and non-material resources. Part 4 discusses the generation of public opinion and the use of white coated propagandists.

The Environmental Scare

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“History has frequently shown that people, in times of crisis and once convinced of the necessity for change, are prepared to accept policies which demand changes in their behaviour so as to help secure better lives for themselves and their children.” – 110

The threat of environmental catastrophe to further the population control agenda is nothing new and continues to this day with the manmade global warming scare. Back in the 1970’s the Club of Rome was not shy at using the environmental catastrophe card to push for population control. Below are some examples from RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

“Moreover, it has been estimated that by 1985 all land surfaces, except those so cold or at such high altitudes as to be incompatible with human habitation or exploration, will have been occupied and utilized by man.” – 89

“Although not yet proven, climatologists are being forced to conclude that our planet has in recent times passed through a period which may well have been optimal as far as food production is concerned. They believe that future decades may well be characterized by extremes – hot and cold, wet and dry – without necessarily a change in average temperature. (4)” – 90

The endnote used to back up this claim is given below:

“(4) There is certainly sufficient evidence for this concern: the Asian monsoons were unsatisfactory for three successive years between 1972-1974; severe droughts in the Sahel and other parts of Africa and the Great Plains area of the United States and Canada in 1974; an unexpected late frost in Brazil in 1975 which may have destroyed as much as 60 per cent of its 1976 coffee crop. The growing season of the best grain producing areas in the Soviet Union is now believed to [be] about a week shorter than it was in the 1950’s; an even more pronounced shift appears to have taken place in the United Kingdom.” – 97

Do these types of arguments sound familiar?

“Much effort has been made in the past ten years, in some industrialized countries, to bring the disadvantage facing many Third World countries to the attention of large numbers of people. If it has met with only limited success, it is probably because it has failed to bring out the concept of interdependence of countries and issues. More attention must in future be focused on information and education on how our planet functions and on the ‘survival fact’ that the claim of the whole is wider and deeper than the claim of any of its parts. There is also a fundamental need to develop a broadly educated political class which is capable of understanding science and the broad implications, possibilities and dangers of technological advance, and which can harness technological advance for constructive social purposes.” – 111

Population Control and The World Food Authority

“… these threats [of food shortage] might well be exacerbated by increasing population pressures and deteriorating climatological conditions.” – 135

“Population control policies carry the important indirect consequence of restricting the supply of unskilled labour, thereby raising its price.” – 73

“If the world is to be liberated from the continual nightmares of hunger and malnutrition, these and the various measures proposed by the FAO [Food and Agricultural Organization] Worlds Food Conference should be implemented to the full and call for the creation of the World Food Authority, with extensive and real powers; or, as a second best, the World Food Council proposed by the World Food Conference.” – 138

“internationally owned and internationally managed [food] buffer stocks…” – 226

“the question of introducing meat rationing should be seriously considered [for developed countries].” – 227

Food as a Weapon

The incredible power that would be accomplished from a massive concentration of food stocks under the control of a single agency did not escape the authors of this report to the Club of Rome. The reigning food situation in the world was dominated by the great dependence of many countries on the North American breadbasket. This gave the Americans a considerable amount of power over their dependent countries.

“the American Secretary for Agriculture who has observed: “Food is a weapon. It is one of the principal tools in our negotiating kit” ” – 29

The further centralization of food stocks under a single international power would only increase the abuse of food supplies not decrease it. This, quite naturally, is the point. The result of this control is well described by Bertrand Russell (who strongly supported this idea) in his 1952 book The Impact of Science of Society [2]:

“To deal with this problem [increasing population and decreasing food supplies] it will be necessary to find ways of preventing an increase in world population. If this is to be done otherwise than by wars, pestilence, and famines, it will demand a powerful international authority. This authority should deal out the world’s food to the various nations in proportion to their population at the time of the establishment of the authority. If any nation subsequently increased its population it should not on that account receive any more food. The motive for not increasing population would therefore be very compelling. What method of preventing an increase might be preferred should be left to each state to decide.” – 124

Conclusion

The final article in this series deals with a variety of issues including global solidarity, regional unions, legal changes and a standing United Nations Peace Force.

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3

[2] Quotes from Bertrand Russell, The Impact of Science on Society (1952). ISBN 0-415-10906-X


A Glimpse into the New Order
Reshaping the International Order Part 6

Brent JessopKnowledge Driven Revolution.com
May 12, 2008

“To obtain an equitable international social and economic order efforts will to be made by everyone… every single member of the world’s population.” – RIO: Reshaping the International Order, 1976 (p100)

This article examines a variety of issues derived from a report to The Club of Rome entitled RIO: Reshaping the International Order. These issues include legal changes for a new social order, regional unions, global solidarity, the East-West dialectic, a standing United Nations Peace Force and the redefinition of rights and freedom.

The Club of Rome is a premiere think tank composed of approximately 100 members including leading scientists, philosophers, political advisors, former politicians and many other influential bureaucrats and technocrats. This series of articles describes the major conclusions of the 1976 book Rio: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome coordinated by Nobel Laureate Jan Tinbergen. The RIO report “addresses the following question: what new international order should be recommended to the world’s statesmen and social groups so as to meet, to the extent practically and realistically possible, the urgent needs of today’s population and the probable needs of future generations?”

Part 1 of this series gives an overview of the proposed new international order described by the RIO report as “humanistic socialism”. This includes: collective neighbourhood armies, a fully planned world economy, global free trade, public international enterprises, proposed changes in consumption patterns among other topics. Changes to the financial system including international taxation and the creation of a World Treasury, World Central Bank and World Currency are examined in part 2. Part 3 addresses the redefinition of sovereignty from “territorial sovereignty” to “functional sovereignty” as well as the use of the concept of the “common heritage of mankind” to gain international control of not just the oceans, atmosphere and outer space but also all material and non-material resources. Part 4 discusses the generation of public opinion and the use of white coated propagandists. The creation of a World Food Authority and its use for population control is examined in part 5.

Legal Foundation of the New Order

From RIO: Reshaping the International Order:

[Italicised text is original emphasis and bolded text is added by author.]

“The legal challenge posed by the new international order can be viewed as the transformation of a system of law based upon Western European culture into the law of the world community. … The [legal] treaty would not represent an attempt to negotiate a new world order in ‘one go’. … In that it would lay down the ‘rules of the international game’, the framework treaty might resemble an international Treaty of Rome, although inevitably much less detailed. … In addition to laying the legal basis for the creation of a new world order, the framework treaty, which could be negotiated within the U.N. system,…” -114

“The Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States already lays down the fundamental principles which should govern international economic relations. The transformation, over time, of the Charter into the proposed framework treaty would greatly facilitate the establishment of a new international order. If this is to be done, some more specific provisions, omitted from the Charter, should be considered for inclusion in the framework treaty. Such provisions could include:

(a) All States shall facilitate access to technology and scientific information;

(b) All States have the obligation to expand and liberalize international trade;

(c) Ocean space and the atmosphere beyond precise limits of national jurisdiction are the common heritage of all mankind: as such they shall be administered exclusively for peaceful purposes through international mechanisms with the participation of all States and their resources shall be exploited with particular regard to the interest of poor countries;

(d) Developed countries have the duty to ensure that net flows of real resources to poor countries shall not be less than the targets established by the U.N. General Assembly;…

(g) All States shall accept an international currency to be created by an international authority;

(h) All States shall accept the evolution of a world organization with the necessary power to plan, to make decisions and to enforce them.” – 117

“[Expansion of] the Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States… should not be envisage until major elements of the new order have been adopted by international agreement.” – 123

Regional Unions in the New Order

“Regional Integration… should be encouraged as a way:… (iii) to exploit more fully the opportunities for closer integration – up to monetary, economic and political union – that will be possible, for a long time to come, only between countries whose close interdependence on one another can generate political support for, and acceptance of, the partial mergers of ‘national sovereignty’ indispensable for such beneficial integration of their policies and institutions.” – 208

“Regional integration and harmonization can help to the extent that it widens markets and avoids wasteful competition for capital; that the manufacturing industries correspond to regionally planned priorities and are effectively controlled by the countries entering into the integration process.” – 238

Global Solidarity in the New Order

“These changes call for massive innovations in and the redirection of systems of formal and informal education. A new world can only be built through solidarity of the world’s people and the participation of large masses of people – hundreds of millions, not hundreds of thousands. The development of global awareness is a prerequisite to the peaceful creation of a new world order. It can even be said that the cultural and educational upgrading which global awareness implies, entails – or is equal to – the new order.” – 77

“they [International Institutions] must be integrated into an all embracing approach aimed at facing the global challenge of the world of today. This approach should be guided by three fundamental objectives, i.e. greater democracy, greater efficiency and greater solidarity.” – 43

“Since the rules of the game will have to be changed to create a new international order, a popularly-based desire for solidarity with developing countries must be established in the developed countries…” – 259

“Solidarity must also permeate society as a whole and engender the feeling of common interest and brotherhood… Without it, it will be impossible to mobilize the capacity for imagination and to achieve the real will required to share society’s resources.” – 62

“… environmental awareness means in reality the introduction of the long term, of the diachronic solidarity with future generations. To the extent to which the protection of the environment may entail costs, these should be looked at as an investment in the future, offset as always by a sacrifice in current consumption and in most cases justified on economic grounds by the reduced cost of preventive actions compared to the costs of remedial ones.” – 162

“It is in the sphere of human environment that the interdependencies between nations are perhaps most clearly evident.” – 32

East-West Dialectic

“As for joint industrial ventures, recent data show that the contracts signed with Western enterprises greatly outnumber the arrangements between the Eastern European partners themselves. According to a Soviet publication, thirty projects involving multilateral agreements have been concluded since 1971 among CMEA countries, whereas in 1974 and 1975 the Soviet Union alone signed an almost equal number of contracts of cooperation with large enterprises from West Germany, France, Italy, Austria, Finland, Japan and the United States, some of them running into billions of dollars… Over-all trade compulsions and competition in world markets in the present international system have grown to the point of making interdependence the law of the world. It is a factor so strong that it overpowers even ideological differences: joint ventures between centrally planned nations and large capitalist enterprises are emerging every day.” – 80

The Standing Army of the New Order

“Ensuring World Security:… The planned and phased reduction in world defence spending, the reinforcement of the U.N. Peace Force together with a World Disarmament Agency…” – 122

“Very few countries have so far pledged their support of and contribution to a standing UN Peace Force. Every effort should be made to promote progress in establishing such a force as a means for peace keeping…” – 304

“Even ‘sky spies’, if operated by a world agency rather than a nation-state, have a clear potential for international peace-keeping.” – 42

Rights and Freedom in the New Order

“The fundamental aim formulated above has its roots in the conviction that all human beings have an equal right to a life of dignity and to satisfaction in their threefold capacities as citizen, producer and consumer.” – 61

“Freedom: History has shown that an increase in the freedom of one individual or of a nation can result in the reduction of another’s freedom in the same and different realm. Freedom must thus be viewed as the maximum compatible with that of others.” – 61

“As a counterpart to these rights, a number of duties must be accepted, especially the duty to use one’s capacities in the interest of an adequate level of production…” – 63

[1] Quotes from Jan Tinbergen, RIO: Reshaping the International Order: A Report to the Club of Rome (1976). ISBN 0-525-04340-3


Also see series on Mankind at the Turning Point: The Second Report to The Club of Rome

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